ADMISSION FEES

An admission price gets you into the pool for any session – unless the pool is closed for training or other purposes.  

Session tickets
Adult
£7.00
Child (age 2-16)
£5.00
Under 2's
£2.00
Spectators
£2.00
Family Swim (2 Adults, 2 Children)
£20.00
Child After School Swim 
£4.00
Under 5’s / 1 Lane
(1 Adult, 1 Under 5 Child)
£5.00
10 TICKET SWIM VOUCHERS
Adult
£63.00
Child
£45.00
SEASON SWIM PASS
Adult
£300.00
Child
£200.00
Family (2 Adults, 2 Children) 
£600.00

Child supervision:

  • Under 8’s and weak swimmers: Always accompanied by a parent in the water (max. 2 children: 1 adult)
  • Under 10’s who can swim: Always accompanied by a parent on site
  • Over 10’s: No supervision required

Session Descriptions

General Swim:  This session is open to all. The diving board is available to use. 

Under 5’s / 1 Lane:  This session will run in the shallow end and have fun toys available for parents to help their young ones play and gain confidence in the water.   Parents must accompany the child in the water (as per our admission rules).  This is not a swim lesson session.

Inflatables: Only 5-15 year olds are able to use the pool during these sessions unless an adult is attending a 5-7 year old. Regular sessions are held during the summer holidays and are a great way for children to gain confidence in the water whilst having fun and burning plenty of energy. These action-packed sessions are well supervised and safely coordinated by our lifeguards. Suitable for 5-15 year olds. All weak and non-swimmers must wear a life jacket (please bring your own as we only have a limited supply, hire charges may apply). Inflatable session rules must be followed at all times.

Lane Swimming: Lane Swimming sessions will have lanes designated as “Fast”, “Medium” and “Slow”. The lanes are double width. All ages are able to participate in lane swimming provided they have the ability to swim laps to a reasonable standard.  

General with 1 Lane: For these sessions a single lane (single or double width) is put into the pool to allow some lane swimming. The diving board is not available for use during this session. This session is open to all.  

Aqua Aerobics: A low impact and high energy water aerobics class that will safely work your cardiovascular fitness and mobility while improving muscle tone. All classes are accompanied with fun and motivating music and led by our fantastic aqua instructors.

Reduced Price Sessions: Quick Dip = £4 adult; £2 child; If swimmers would like to stay on for lane swimming after Quick Dip then normal prices apply.

Cold Water Lane Swimming: During the shoulder seasons (late September – November and March – April) we may offer cold water lane swimming on the weekends and possibly during the week – subject to demand and lifeguard availability.  Details are published on our  Facebook page.

Swimming Lessons

Bookings for 2022 season Swimming Lessons are now live. Click Here.

Yoga by the Pool

Yoga and Sound Bath by the Pool with Wild Nest Yoga.
This is a gentle yoga flow for all abilities and a wonderful practice for all to  enjoy while overlooking the pool. 
The sessions start with a seated sequence, connecting with the breath and beautiful outdoors followed by a sun salutation to the setting sun before ending in a sound bath.

Please bring a mat if you have one, there will be some available to borrow and on colder evenings, lots layers and a blanket might be required to stay warm during the sound bath.

Click here to book your space.

Private Hire

Private hire of the whole pool is available on Friday, Saturday and Sunday evenings from 6:30 pm.   It may be available at other times by exception.  This includes the lifeguard costs.   A gas BBQ is also available for hire.  The inflatable may be available for hire subject to availability of lifeguards.  

For all private hire queries please contact: info@petersfieldpool.org

Clubs and Coaching

Total Immersion Swim Coaching is available at POASP with James Ewart. Find out about Total Immersion Swim Coaching here. Contact James at ticoachjames@icloud.com or via his website.
 
The Petersfield Triathlon Club trains once per week at the Petersfield Open Air Swimming Pool.  For more information please contact: http://www.petersfieldtriathlonclub.co.uk

COLD WATER SWIMMING

Prices
Adult
£6.00
Child (age 2-16)
£4.00

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF COLD-WATER SWIMMING?

  • Helps you burn calories. Your heart rate tends to increase when swimming in cold water as the heart has to pump faster to keep you warm. This means more calories are burned than if you were swimming in warm water.
  • Enhances your circulation.Cold temperatures narrow your arteries, causing your heart to work harder.
  • Boosts your immune system.Cold water swimming improves your white blood cell count as your body adapts to changing conditions, such as low temperature. In the long term, this aids your body in becoming better at initiating its defence system.
  • Makes you stronger in body and mind.Your body adapts to stresses it is placed under and becomes better prepared to handle other types of stress.
  • Helps you socialise. Joining an outdoor swimming society/group gives you the chance to make new friends and share a new experience with like-minded people.
  • Improves mental health.Cold water swimming helps you to feel good by reducing stress and making you feel more relaxed.
  • Increases your libido. Cold water improves the production of testosterone and oestrogen, which is great for libido and fertility. This can enhance your confidence, mood, and relationship with a partner.

COLD WATER SWIMMING TIPS

  1. Take cold showers

Immersing yourself in colder water daily can help cold water swimmers to start training. Cold water showers are the best way to prepare for the water temperature of swimming outdoors.

Being in very cold water can cause an initial cold-water shock, resulting in hyperventilation. If you’re unfamiliar with cold water shock response, it can make you feel panicked in a scenario where it’s essential to stay calm.

By acclimatising yourself to colder temperatures, your body will become familiar with it and help you avoid the initial panic that comes with cold water shock.

  1. Always warm up beforehand

Though the water may look tempting, spend a little time on dry land warming up before you go swimming.

Doing a quick jog before getting into cold water will help to increase your core temperature and heart rate to help you deal with the cold-water shock when entering the water. It will also help to loosen your muscles, improving your flexibility during swimming.

It doesn’t have to be a jog. A few star-jumps or burpees could be just the thing to raise your body heat. This is particularly good if it’s a cold time of year when removing your warm layers of clothes might not feel welcome!

  1. Enter the water slowly

When the body is immersed in cold water, and its temperature drops, its natural reaction is to gasp for breath, your heart rate will increase, and you might feel as though you’re hyperventilating.

Don’t be frightened by this, as there will naturally be some initial shortness of breath, and this is just your body reacting naturally to the cold. The best thing to do to avoid cold water shock is to remain calm and follow these steps:

  • Splash your face with some of the water first. This will get your body used to the water temperature.
  • Gradually wading into the water is far better than rushing in at once. Entering the water gently allows your core body temperature to cool more slowly, and you get used to the water as temperatures drop.
  • Keep your head above the surface if you’re new to cold water swimming, as the arteries may constrict.
  • If you have asthma or a heart condition, it’s best to get advice from your doctor.
  • Finally, remember to breathe. Take a slow intake through the nose and exhale even more slowly through your mouth. This is how we should breathe if we want to calm the body down, which is precisely the desired effect when swimming in cold water.
  1. Don’t push yourself too hard

Knowing your limits is important when you’re a beginner at cold water swimming. If you’ve made the effort to pack your kit and arrange the trip, you’ll want to make the most of it and spend as much time in the water as possible. This isn’t always the best idea as your body adapts to spending time in cold water.

Start with short sessions in the water. At first, even a few minutes is ok. Gradually work up towards longer lengths as your body gets used to the feeling of cold. You should be aiming to go for a dip at least once a week.

Cold water swimming has a different effect on your body, and you can become tired very quickly because you are using energy to swim and extra energy to keep warm.

If you feel exhausted, fatigued, or achy, you could be at risk of mild hypothermia, so get out of the water as soon as possible and get warm immediately. If you experience deep shivering, you should leave the water and preserve body heat with a warm drink like hot water or herbal tea — nothing too sugary. Pile on good warm outdoor clothes to generate heat and try to keep moving.

  1. Get dressed in warm clothes afterwards

Avoid any temptation to have a hot shower immediately after your cold-water swim. This can cause blood pressure to drop as blood vessels dilate too fast.

Instead, dry off and get dressed in warm clothes. Have a hot drink and keep your body moving to return to your normal body temperature.